Bike Tour

Cape Cod Weekend Getaway by Bike, Ferry and Train

Cape Cod Weekend Getaway by Bike, Ferry and Train

Use a ferry and a bike-friendly train to take in Cape Cod's scenic coastlines and rail trail at a casual speed of less than 25 miles a day.

Will Bike for Food in Atlanta

Will Bike for Food in Atlanta

Atlanta's BeltLine trail and the food scene are a marriage made in heaven. Take a relaxed, 3+ mile tour of 3 foodie hotspots while taking in breathtaking murals along the trail. And if you need to work up an appetite between food stops, we've noted 2 parks and the Stone Mountain Trail to explore. The route is curated and inspired by "Will Bike for Food", an article published in the Atlanta-Journal Constitution written by its food and dining editor Ligaya Figueras.

Little Mountain to Waterfront Shopping Ride in Vancouver

Little Mountain to Waterfront Shopping Ride in Vancouver

Vancouver boasts lots of shopping hot spots for tourists and locals alike. For the more discerning shopper, some of the most unique and local boutiques are found in Gastown and along the stretch of South Main, otherwise known as SoMa and Little Mountain. Main Street is also THE PLACE for vintage lovers, with more second hand stores than anywhere else in the city. 

Lakefront Cruise in Chicago

Lakefront Cruise in Chicago

This ride will take you through Chicago's North-side and place you right out on the shoreline of Lake Michigan. Heading South you will have views the city's looming skyline, rest in it's shadows at Oak Street Beach and cruise back North through Lincoln Park where there are plenty of worthy detours along the way. 

This is a route I take regularly in the summer with my son in tow. We get quality father-son time, with the wind in our hair, we see the city and draw inspiration and ideas.

Seawall & City, Art & Eatables in Vancouver

Seawall & City, Art & Eatables in Vancouver

The gem of Vancouver’s public space, and our best recreational bike route by far, is the seawall. Construction around the Stanley Park portion began in 1917 and now at 22km provides a continuous public space separated from vehicle traffic along almost all of central Vancouver’s waterfront. It’s pretty impressive — so good one wonders if it’s the reason Vancouver doesn’t have a central plaza or any pedestrian streets, but that’s another matter. In recent years Vancouver has also made great strides in building 8 to 80 (safe for 8 to 80 year olds) accessible separated bicycle infrastructure throughout city streets. This tour aims to give a taste of the seawall and recent separate bike paths, along with a healthy dose of some of my favourite pieces of public art, cafés and watering holes. Oh, and there’s a first rate gelato shop and amazing Chinese garden.